Richard Campbell

I’ve had the pleasure of working with many of you to improve cycling around Vancouver and BC through HUB, BEST, Canada Bikes and the BCCC. Working with political leaders and staff in all levels of government, we have had many successes. From wider sidewalks on the Lions Gate Bridge and the Ironworks Bridge, the Bicycle and Pedestrian Path on the Canada Line Bridge, to the Central Valley Greenway. All told, these improvements total around $70 million.

While there are many reasons why I work to move cycling forward, what I find most rewarding is seeing more and more people cycling. Especially families with children.

Still, there is much to do. BC is a large province with great potential.

We need cycle tracks along main streets so people can safely and comfortably cycle to shops, cafes, restaurants, offices and other businesses.

We need safe connections between communities for locals and tourists. At least wide shoulders free of debris and preferable paths separated from high speed traffic.

We need to improve the Motor Vehicle Act or even better, replace it with a modern road users act that makes the safety of people cycling and walking the priority. Key changes include removing the requirement to ride single file allowing you to legally ride beside friends and families and a safe passing distance law.

We need improved standards for paths and roads ensuring that obstacles are not placed on or near bicycle paths, that fencing and railings do not cause crashes or serious injuries and that shoulders are wide, well maintained and kept clear of hazards. 

We need need to build stronger more organized cycling community across the Province to encourage leaders to make commitments to improve cycling and to provide the grassroots support they need when they show leadership in moving cycling.

We need your support to make this all happen. As the BCCC not a charity, we can’t issue tax receipts. However, that means we are not limited in the amount of money that we can and will devote for advocacy.

I look forward to continue working with you to make this beautiful province a great place for people of all ages to enjoy cycling.

Thank you for your great work and support.


  • Speed and Safety Review - Letter - Minister Stone - August 2014

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1BUn-sd-LQNrR9AuQH1IUrIu8th7We4ms5_q7d-gVZ04/edit


  • responded to Cycling is Mass Transportation - It Needs to Funded Accordingly with submitted 2018-04-19 19:32:21 -0700

    Cycling is Mass Transportation - It Needs to Funded Accordingly

    Increases in the number of people cycling and walking in BC communities including Victoria, Whistler, North Vancouver, Kelowna and Vancouver, demonstrate that cycling and walking are mass transportation solutions worthy of substantial investment.

    To help enable everyone to cycle and walk for their daily trips, we recommend that the Provincial Government accelerate its cycling and walking investment to $100 million per year. This, along with investment from communities and the Federal Government, will enable communities to build out their cycling networks thus enabling the benefits including GHG emissions reductions and health care cost savings to be realized sooner. This funding would be used to upgrade Provincial roads and bridges; complete cycling and walking networks in communities; provide Safe and Healthy Routes to School; and for paths used by visitors and residents.

    {{include?page_slug=everyone_email_leaders}}

    This investment will help address the deficit estimated to be $2 billion for cycling and $2.6 billion for walking. Around $7 billion will be invested in B.C. over the next 3 years in transportation and the Government is projecting surpluses of over $200 million per year so there is plenty of funding available.

    Cycling and walking are popular activities that many people in B.C. want to do more often

    • Almost 70% of adults in B.C. ride a bicycle at least once a year, 42% at least once a month and 25% at least once a week.

    • Cycling and walking are especially popular among young people (18-35) with 8% cycling and 10% walking to work.

    • Many people want to cycle more, with 65% indicating they would ride more if there were separated bike lanes that protected them from traffic.

    • 14% of adults 18-35 years old say cycling would be their ideal commute.

    • 34% of B.C. residents say walking (23%) or cycling (11%) would be their ideal commute.

    Cycling and walking are popular activities that many people in B.C. want to do more often

    • Almost 70% of adults in B.C. ride a bicycle at least once a year, 42% at least once a month and 25% at least once a week.

    • Cycling and walking are especially popular among young people (18-35) with 8% cycling and 10% walking to work.

    • Many people want to cycle more, with 65% indicating they would ride more if there were separated bike lanes that protected them from traffic.

    • 14% of adults 18-35 years old say cycling would be their ideal commute.

    • 34% of B.C. residents say walking (23%) or cycling (11%) would be their ideal commute.

    There is broad public support for cycling improvements

    • 72% of B.C. On the Move Engagement Survey respondents supported enhancing cycling infrastructure.

    Where significant investments have been made, cycling has increased dramatically

    • Between 2008 and 2015, daily cycling trips by City of Vancouver residents increased from 50,000 to 131,000. In 2015, 10% of Vancouver residents cycled to work, up from 4.4% in 2011.

    • In the Central Okanagan, daily cycling trips increased by 43% to 15,400 between 2007 and 2013.

    • Whistler’s cycling commute mode share was 8% in 2011, an increase of 31% since 2006.

    Many trips are within reasonable cycling distance

    • In the Netherlands, electrically assisted bicycle trips average a distance of 9.8 km each way, while regular bicycle trips average 6.3 km.

    • According to the 2011 National Household Survey, 42% of commutes are under 5 km.

    • In B.C. 65% of all commutes are under 10 km, making them practical using an electric bicycle.

    Inadequate Investment - Active Transportation Deficit

    Regions and communities across the province have produced extensive cycling network plans. Unfortunately, due to lack of investment, these cycling networks may not be complete for 30 to 50 years unless senior levels of government dramatically increase funding. The BC Communities Road Safety Survey identified pedestrian and cyclist safety as top issues. For the the 81 municipalities that responded, “The most commonly reported challenges to implementing road safety activities were funding and staff with expertise.”

    • TheCapital Regional District’s  Pedestrian & Cycling Master Plan estimated the cost of upgrading the bike network to attract people of all ages and abilities is around $275 million.

    • In order to meet its target of 10%, TransLink has estimated that completing all-ages cycling networks around the Metro Vancouver region will cost at least $850 million.

    • Kelowna’s cycling and walking Plan is estimated to cost $267 million. While the city is currently putting money aside for the program, staff have warned that at the current level of funding, the city will only have approximately $90 million to fund the plan.

    • Squamish’s recently approved active transportation plan is estimated to cost $36 million.  

    • Surrey’s cycling plan includes over 400 km of additional bike lanes and paths. With current funding, it plans on completing around 12 km per year, but has indicated that additional funding from senior levels of government would speed-up the implementation of the plan.

    Internationally, other jurisdictions are committing to significant increases in cycling. Norway, whose population is only slightly larger than B.C.’s, is planning to invest $1.25 billion in Cycling Highways to link suburbs to city centres.

    More Information

    Budget Submission - 2017 (includes references for information above)

    Communities on the Move recommending investing $100 million per year in active transportation.{{action?html=I Want Bike Paths EVERYWHERE!&anchor=#mailer}}

     

    Official response from submitted

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  • Making Roads Right for Ride-hailing Report

    With smart planning, policies, taxes and regulations, the introduction of ride-hailing provides BC the unique opportunity to transform communities, making roads safer and more attractive to people walking and cycling while more effectively accommodating transit, taxis, goods delivery and automated vehicles.

    Initial financing from the ride-hailing industry and an on-going tax on ride-hailing should fund the implementation, operation and enforcement of:

    • Pick up/drop off zones;
    • Protected bike lanes;
    • Transit lanes and priority measures; and
      Sidewalk and streetscape improvements.

    Other measures, that will ensure that ride-hailing reduces congestion and is safe and environmentally beneficial, include:

    • Mandate or incentivize the use of small, lighter vehicles that are less likely to seriously injure people walking and cycling
    • Ensure that pedicabs, tandem bicycles & electric Low Speed Vehicles (LSV) can be used for ride-hailing
    • Require that only electric or pedal powered vehicles can be used ride-hailing
    • Mandate pedestrian and cycling collision avoidance systems
    • Enforce zero tolerance for distracted driving and stopping in bus and bike lanes
    • Enact a safer passing law, increased penalties for dooring, blanket speed limits under 50km/h and other Motor Vehicle Act updates
    • Fine the ride-hailing companies for driver infractions to incentivize them to find solutions to prevent infractions.
    • Establish distance-based insurance & mobility pricing for ride-hailing

    {{enter_email?logged_in_html==

    View the Making Roads Right for Ride-hailing report

    Download the Making Roads Right for Ride-hailing report

    &&logged_out_message_html==Please enter your email address to access the Making Roads Right for Ride-hailing, Delivery and Taxis - Ready for Automated Vehicles report&&button_text==Access the Report}}

    We update this report as we get more information. Please enter your comments below on cycling ride-hailing issues and opportunities that are not included in the report.

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    Image: NACTO

     

     


  • Active Transportation Plan and Investment - Minister Trevena - Letter - Jan 2018

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1fixialK0kDkxT_3wtPGcGYbuAZTrvYVu0X-jNXU2oRM/edit


  • Active Transportation Plan - Letter - Minister Trevena - August 2017

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1pLuTebl16jPsMzT-tEpP84B7Ox4INmdQoyP4kA3r4Pg/edit


  • ICBC Review and Road Safety - Letter - Attorney General Eby - July 2017

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1cB71DIVWS-YM47AgTqBZ5iC8CAoCZDTRvMuvCKtZLuY/edit


  • Lets Make this Beautiful Province a Great Place to Cycle

    I’ve had the pleasure of working with many of you to improve cycling around Vancouver and BC through HUB, BEST, Canada Bikes and the BCCC. Working with political leaders and staff in all levels of government, we have had many successes. From wider sidewalks on the Lions Gate Bridge and the Ironworks Bridge, the Bicycle and Pedestrian Path on the Canada Line Bridge, to the Central Valley Greenway. All told, these improvements total around $70 million.

    While there are many reasons why I work to move cycling forward, what I find most rewarding is seeing more and more people cycling. Especially families with children.

    Still, there is much to do. BC is a large province with great potential. We need cycle tracks along main streets so people can safely and comfortably cycle to shops, cafes, restaurants, offices and other businesses.

    We need safe connections between communities for locals and tourists. At least wide shoulders free of debris and preferable paths separated from high speed traffic. We need improved standards for paths and roads ensuring that obstacles are not placed on or near bicycle paths, that fencing and railings do not cause crashes or serious injuries and that shoulders are wide, well maintained and kept clear of hazards. 

    We need a billion for bikes so we can fast track the completion of all ages and abilities cycling networks across the province. It is time for bold action.

    We need need to build stronger more organized cycling community across the Province to encourage leaders to make commitments to improve cycling and to provide the grassroots support they need when they show leadership in moving cycling. We need your support to make this all happen. Please Become a Member!

    I look forward to continue working with you to make this beautiful province a great place for people of all ages to enjoy cycling. Thank you for your great work and support.

    Photo: Cycling in Copenhagen - Richard Campbell


  • published donation in Widgets 2018-04-15 21:31:53 -0700

    donation

    Includes a donation form.

    page_slug=the donation page 

    or 

    parent_slug=the parent page - Includes all the child donation pages

    [display_content=false] - Don't display the content (introduction) from the donation page

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  • Green Infrastructure - Letter - Minister Robinson - March 2018

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/18_q-xlQG6WsWfuj9BI83wX70MckVPv6jJ2u98Lcrr1c/edit


  • Ride-hailing - Letter - Minister Trevena - April 2018

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1BKEaYZz4DzMOUr9NJ_h_rHk5XGBvJY2HY-OEOZq9Ck0/preview


  • Highway Maintenance Contracts - Letter - Minister Trevena - March 2018

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1SLupLz4Pp14tmd9FMP0Gczzq0LsmRVFD_4Ur6dNoOC4/preview


  • responded to Average Speed Cameras Could Make BC's Roads Safer with submitted 2018-02-06 16:42:12 -0800

    Average Speed Cameras Could Make BC's Roads Safer

    Average speed cameras that track speed over a section of road have dramatically reduced fatal and serious crashes in Scotland. A much better idea than capping minor injury that would save lives and reduce ICBC's costs.

    Take Action: Email the Premier

    From CBC:

    Average speed cameras track the speed of a motorist at multiple stations over a stretch of road or highway. A car can enter or exit anywhere along the route and, upon exiting, the average speed of the vehicle travelled is calculated and compared to the speed limit. Drivers who go over are automatically ticketed.

    It's a system that Scotland has had in place since 2005. "The impact of them is really quite incredible," said Humza Yousaf, Scotland's minister for transport. "People in Scotland now very much accept that they work."

    Yousaf says that numbers of speeding incidents have dropped dramatically. "When we had them on the A77 [highway] back in 2005, fatal and serious casualties dropped by 74 per cent within a really short period of time," he said "But the real interesting one is the route that we've just done in October 2017 of last year. The first few months of data previous to the cameras, three in five vehicles were speeding. Now it's one in 100 vehicles."

    From Transport Scotland:

    Additionally, this evidence has also shown that only 1 in every 5000 vehicles are now speeding at more than 10mph over the speed limit.  This is also a significant improvement when considered against the fact that 1 out of every 5 vehicles were speeding excessively prior to the installation of ASC.

    More at: http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/british-columbia/how-average-speed-cameras-could-make-b-c-s-roads-safer-1.4520261

    Photo: Transport Scotland

    Official response from submitted

    {{include?page_slug=road_safety_emailer}}

    {{donation?page_slug=donate_road_safety}}


  • published Secure Test in Public Testing 2018-02-04 23:14:50 -0800

  • responded to Slow Down and Save Lives – 30 is the New 50 with submitted 2018-02-03 22:02:05 -0800

    Slow Down and Save Lives – 30 is the New 50

    Motor vehicle speed reduction through road design, enforcement and eduction is a key component of the comprehensive Active Transportation Strategy that we are encouraging the Province to implement. We recommend: 

    • A default speed limit of 30 km/h on all residential streets
    • Allowing municipalities to blanket speed limits under 50 km/h
    • More funding for traffic calming

    Email the Premier regarding safer speeds1000px-Zeichen_274.1.svg_-150x150.png

    For people walking and cycling, motor vehicle speed is the major threat. Vision Zero – An ethical approach to safety and mobility, pioneered in Sweden, is a philosophy of road safety that eventually no one will be killed or seriously injured within the road transport system. They recommend a maximum speed of 30km/h at locations with possible conflict between pedestrians and cars which in many cities, would be pretty much all the streets. It acknowledges that people driving cars and walking will make mistakes and these mistakes should not result in people dying. The best way to do that is to lower speeds.

    Higher speeds both increases the likelihood of collisions and increase the severity of collisions. Safe Kids Canada states that regarding pedestrian safety:

    At speeds greater than 30-40 km/h, both drivers and pedestrians may be more likely to make mistakes in judging the time required to stop or cross the street safely.1 In addition, drivers are known to underestimate their speed.2 Reducing vehicle speed has proven to be effective in preventing crashes and reducing the severity of injuries.3

    Even small reductions in vehicle speed can yield significant reductions in injury risk. It is estimated that a pedestrian struck by a car travelling at 50 km/hr is eight times more likely to be killed than someone hit at 30 km/h.

    As shown in the following graphs from The Impact of Lowered Speed Limits in Urban and Metropolitan Areas by J. Acher et al, the research is very compelling.Speed_graph1.png

    Speed_graph2.png

    In the BBC article, 20mph speed zones cut road injuries by 40%, study says, Dr Chris Grundy, of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine estimates that 20mph (32 km/h) zones in London would save 200 lives a year, increasing to 700 if the zones were extended.

    Not surprisingly, lower speeds also correspond to higher levels of cycling. Cities in Europe with 30 km/h speed limits have cycling mode shares from between 25% and 30% compared to 2% to 3% in British cities. The Copenhagenize 30 km/h Zones Work is worth a read.

    Strasbourg is lowering speeds throughout the city to 30km/h to improve safety of cyclists and pedestrians and as stated by the Mayor:

    The public roads no longer belong to automobiles alone. They must be reimagined to be redistributed in a fairer manner between all forms of transportation. The protection of the most vulnerable is thus reinforced in zones in which all users have access but in which the pedestrian is king.

    zones30g.998.jpg
    Barcelona has already had encouraging results by lowering speed limits to 30 km/hr on 300km of single lane roads. Their pilot project reduced injuries by 30%. They are now lowering speeds on all single lane streets to 30 km/hr. Thanks to Ryan Mijker for passing this example on.

    In BC, we still have a ways to go. Municipalities across the province have repeatedly requested that the Province allow them to set blanket speed limits below 50 km/h. Given the lack of provincial action, the only option left to cities is to place 30 km/h signs on every block of a street which can be expensive and time consuming. Fortunately, the City of Vancouver is in the process of doing exactly this on bikeways. As well, in December 2011, the City of Burnaby adopted the recommendation for the trial installation of 30 km/h speed limit signs along sections of existing bikeways in two neighbourhoods.

    Reducing vehicle speeds will also require traffic calming, education and enforcement but 30 km/h speed limits are the critical first step. It sends a clear message that people’s lives are more important than probably getting there a couple of minutes sooner. Emphasis on probably. A collision that is preventable by going slower may mean that they don’t arrive at all or at least delayed for hours at the scene.

    Official response from submitted

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  • BC Communities Proving Lots of People Will Bike to Work

    Four years ago when we asked people if they wanted to cycle more; 65% said yes, if they could ride on protected bike lanes. Now, more and more BC communities are proving that is indeed the case with the 2016 Census results showing 12 communities with more than 10% of commuters cycling to work. In fact, thanks in large part to increases in cycling to work in BC, cycling is the fastest growing mode of commuting across Canada.

    Please write the Premier to ensure everyone in BC can cycle safety to work

    Leading the way are the Ashnola (33%) and Qualicum (29%) First Nations followed by Thompson-Nicola (21%), Revelstoke (15%), Soowahlie (14%), Quaaout (13%), Victoria, Oak Bay, the Comox First Nation, Stewart and Whistler. See how many people commute via bike in your community via Census MapperSeveral neighbourhoods in Vancouver and Victoria have similarly high levels of cycling to work including Strathcona (18%), Fairfield / Gonzales (17%), Kensington-Cedar Cottage (16%) Grandview Woodlands (15%) and Fernwood (15%). 

    Unfortunately, many BC residents still don’t have access to safe cycling routes for their daily trips. People like to live in areas where they can walk and cycle and are often willing to pay more for housing to do so. Those with lower incomes including many families with children are forced to live in out in areas where it is difficult, dangerous and time consuming to walk and cycle. The result is lower levels of physical activity, higher transportation costs, limited access to jobs & services and a higher risk of injury & death in motor vehicle collisions. Those in rural communities without regular transit service are especially in need of affordable transportation choices. Census Mapper clearly shows the impact of distance on cycling levels.

    Key measures that will help enable those who live further away from employment centres, educational institutions and other key destinations cycle for their daily trips include:

    • Complete networks of all ages and abilities cycling networks that enable everyone to safely cycle via the direct routes
    • Cycle highways to enable longer distance commutes and other trips
    • Motor vehicle free rail trails for cycling, walking and other forms of active transportation as well as horseback riding
    • Electric bikes to enable more people to cycle longer distances

    Please write the Premier. Let him know about your cycling challenges and the improvements you would like to see in your community.

    {{is_intern?yes_html=Cycling to Work Mode Share 2006, 2011, 2016}}

    Official response from submitted

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  • responded to Ontario Investing $93 Million in Cycling This Year with submitted 2017-12-04 14:15:08 -0800

    Ontario Investing $93 Million in Cycling This Year

    Ontario is investing $93 million in cycling infrastructure this year, more than doubling the initial $42.5 million announced earlier this year. This is 10 times the amount that the BC Government has invested this year through the BikeBC cost sharing program. Toronto alone is receiving $25.6 million, almost 3 times the funding for all of BC in in 2017. This is in spite of the fact that BC's rate of cycling commuting in BC is twice that of Ontario's. According to the 2016 Census, 2.5% of people in BC cycle to work while 1.2% commute by bike in Ontario.

    Please Email the Premier. Ask him to dramatically increase investment in cycling.

    The investment is part of Ontario's Climate Change Action Plan and is funded by proceeds from the province's cap on pollution and carbon market. While the BC Government recently announced increases in the Carbon tax can be used for green initiatives, it has yet to commit any of this revenue to cycling infrastructure.

    Chris Ballard, Minister of the Environment and Climate Change states:

    Reducing greenhouse gas pollution from transportation is one of the most important actions we can take to fight climate change. Creating more bike lanes in communities big and small makes it easier and safer for people across the province to choose cleaner, quicker ways of getting around. This investment shows how our Climate Change Action Plan and carbon market are working together to build a healthier planet for future generations.

    Eleanor McMahon, Minister of Tourism, Culture and Sport says:

    Cycling keeps our communities healthy, active and well connected. We want to ensure that people across Ontario have the infrastructure they need to keep cycling safe, accessible and easy for all. The benefits to jumping on a bike are endless – it can be a wonderful way to explore our cities and a healthy method to get those much-needed errands done

    More at: Major New Investment to Make Cycling Safer and More Convenient

    {{action?html=Yes. I want protected bike lanes Everywhere!!&tag=Provincial Funding Letter&anchor=#mailer&action_count_page_slug=provincial_funding_letter&action_label=emails sent}}{{hide_welcome_widget=true}}

    Official response from submitted

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  • posted about Cycle Highways on Facebook 2017-12-01 20:25:25 -0800
    Everyone should be able to safely cycle everywhere.

    Cycle Highways

     

    Cycle Highways (also know as Bicycle Superhighways) are high standard and continuous paved bicycle routes designed to reduce travel times and thus facilitate long distance (5-20 km) cycling trips. They connect communities and major destinations including residential areas, concentrations of jobs, schools and public transit.

    Especially when combined with the use of electric bicycles, Cycle Super Highways can dramatically increase the distances people are willing to ride thus significantly reducing the use of motor vehicles.

    Features include:

    • Separate, high standard paths reserved for cycling separated from pedestrians and motor vehicles
    • Two-way cycleway, separate lanes, 3.0 to 4.0m wide depending on volumes
    • Design speeds of up to 40km/h on flat sections, higher on downhill
    • Requirements for maximum grades and minimum curve radii.
    • High operating and maintenance standards including frequent snow, ice and debris removal
    • Grade separated crossings (overpasses or underpasses) of major roads and highways
    • Few stops
    • Lighting
    • Greenwaves - Traffic signals synchronized to average cycling speeds

    Gehl-1.jpg

    Cycling Embassy of Denmark

    Keys to success is cost-sharing funding from senior levels of government and a coordinating body that can help ensure that routes are of a consistent high quality across jurisdictions.

    While even with Cycle Super Highways, the mode share of longer trips by bicycle will likely be lower than that of shorter trips, the benefits of longer trips by bike are much greater both from a transportation and an environmental point of view. For example, one 15km bike trip replacing a car trip has 5 times the GHG emissions reductions as a 3km. Basically getting 4% of 15km trips by bike will have pretty much the same benefits as 20% of 3km trips by bike.

    Cycle Super Highways have been implemented or are being planning in countries including:

    • Netherlands:15 implemented, 20 planned
    • London: 12 planned
    • Australia: planned in Perth, Adelaide and Brisbane
    • Germany: 1 under construction, Munich: 14 planned
    • Copenhagen

    Our recommendations to the BC Government include:

    1. Develop guidelines and best practices for Cycle Super Highways 
    2. Work with regions and municipalities to plan and implement Cycle Super Highways
    3. Include Cycle Super Highways when building and upgrading Provincial highways and bridges
    4. Provide regions and municipalities with assistance to design Cycle Super Highways 
    5. Provide funding for  Cycle Super Highways

    Possible Cycle Super Highways for British Columbia include:

    • BC Parkway
    • Central Valley Greenway
    • Portside Greenway, Ironworkers Memorial Bridge, Mountain Highway Interchange
    • North Shore Spirit Trail
    • Lochside Trail
    • Galloping Goose
    • E and N Trail
    • Massey Bridge and Highway 99
    • Ironworkers Memorial Bridge and Highway 1

    More information

    Cycle Highways - Safe Affordable Transportation for British Columbians | BCCC (ViewDownload PDF)

    Cycle Highways | German Institute of Urban Affairs (View

    Share your ideas for Cycle Super Highways in BC and examples of Cycle Super Highways elsewhere 

     


  • responded to BC Budget Report Recommends Increased Investment in Cycling & Walking with submitted 2017-11-25 23:28:28 -0800

    BC Budget Report Recommends Increased Investment in Cycling & Walking

    Some good news! The Finance Committee's report on the 2018 Budget consultations recommends the creation of an active transportation strategy including increased investment in active transportation infrastructure, education, promotion and safety. 

    This marks the first time the creation active transportation strategy has been mentioned in a budget report, an important step forward. Still, work needs to be done to ensure the BC Government promptly moves forward on the creation of a strategy and commits the resources needed to create and implement a great active transportation that will enable everyone to safely cycle for their daily trips.

    Please Email the Premier for an Active Transportation Strategy and Increased Funding Cycling

    Specifically, from the Report on the Budget 2018 Consultation (page 68):

    Active Transportation (Cycling and Walking)

    81. Create a provincial active transportation strategy, including increased investment in active transportation infrastructure, education and promotion, as well as safety initiatives.

    The report said quite a few of the survey responses focused on active transportation and transit. Thanks to all of you who responded to the survey or made submissions!

    BC Cycling Coalition Executive Director Richard Campbell made a presentation to the committee in September highlighting the need for safe affordable active transportation networks in communities across BC. Thanks also to our partner organizations, HUB and BC Healthy Living Alliance for making presentations and submissions.

    BC Cycling Coalition Budget Submission

    {{action?html=More Bike Paths Please!&tag=Provincial Funding Letter&anchor=#mailer&action_count_page_slug=provincial_funding_letter&action_label=emails sent}}{{hide_welcome_widget=true}}

    Official response from submitted

    {{donation?page_slug=donate_everyone}}


  • commented on Rail Trails Emailer 2017-10-31 00:08:37 -0700
    Cycling and walking are healthy, affordable green transportation and recreation that everyone in BC can afford. Unfortunately, the rail trails that connect many communities in BC are being wrecked by motorized making it difficult for people to cycle, walk and use wheelchairs on. As a result, the many people can’t afford expensive motorized vehicles such as ATVs and motor bikes are not able to use these trails.


    Please help enable people to choice healthy transportation by banning motorized vehicles from the Trans Canada Trail and other rail trails in BC and provide motorized users with other trails and routes that are more appropriate for motorized use.

  • responded to More Bucks for Biking - Take the BC Budget Survey! with submitted 2017-10-12 12:00:26 -0700

    More Bucks for Biking - Take the BC Budget Survey!

    Last year, thanks to your efforts engaging in the budget process and writing letters, the BC Government increased its investment in cycling from $6 million to $9.25 million. A good increase but still not enough to enable everyone to cycle for their daily trips. Much more is needed. 

    The BC Legislature's Select Standing Committee on Finance and Government Services is asking for your input.  

    Please complete the survey or make a submission by 5:00 p.m. on Monday, October 16. 

    Here are some suggestions for survey responses that you can copy over (If your responses disappear, just click Launch Survey button again). Always good to add your local cycling projects and other ideas. Especially ones that will have a big impact. More in our submission from last year. Please also send your comments to the Premier.

    Question One
    What are your top priorities to help make life more affordable in British Columbia?

    -  Investing $100 million per year in networks of bike paths, protected bike lanes and sidewalks in communities around the province. Every child, woman and man in BC should be able to chose to walk and cycle for their daily trips. Cycling and walking are the most affordable transportation solutions both for individuals and governments. This will also help make our roads safer reducing crashes, injuries, health care costs and ICBC rates.

    - Removing the PST and add rebating for electric bikes. This will help make green transportation more affordable for many people in BC especially with long commutes or mobility challenges. It is unfair that there are rebates for electric cars but not for electric bikes.

    - Increased funding for maintenance of shoulders, bike lanes and paths used by people who cycle.

    - More funding for road safety education focused on cycling.

    - Increased funding for cycling skills training for children. 

    Question Two

    What service improvements should be given priority?

    - More enforcement of traffic laws focused on saving lives; speeding, distracted driving and drunk driving. This will help save lives, reduce healthcare costs and lower ICBC rates.

    Question Three
    What are your ideas, approaches, and/or priorities for creating good jobs and to build a sustainable economy in every corner of our province?

    - Investing funding in cycling and walking networks across the Province will create jobs in communities around the province.

    - Cycling and walking infrastructure generates significantly more jobs per amount invested than road projects.

    - BC has great cycling tourism potential. Unfortunately, BC is not investing enough in building and maintaining high quality cycling tourism routes. For example, sections of the Trans Canada Trail and Kettle Valley Railway are unridable due to poor maintenance and damage caused by motorized vehicles.

    - Good cycling and walking facilities will attract talent and businesses to BC communities.

    Official response from submitted

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Over 20 year’s expertise championing cycling and sustainable transportation. He is a founding director of the BCCC, HUB and BEST and Conference Director of Velo-city Global 2012..
$5,067.00 raised
GOAL: $5,000.00
Donate on behalf of Richard Campbell:
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